ENSFR conference 2016 programme

‘The Child of the Century’: Reading and Writing Short Fiction Across Media

Edge Hill University, UK

 

 

Day 1, Friday 13th May 2016

 

TIME SESSION VENUE
8.30 – 9.00 Registration & Refreshments Business School Foyer
9.00 – 9.30 Welcome address B001
9.30 – 11.00 Parallel Sessions: Panels 1 & 2
Panel 1: Form, Format and Short Story Publishing B002
Narrative Empathetic Writing Devices: A Study of Short Fiction Formatting.

Amanda Bigler (Loughborough University, UK)

Embracing Modes: How the children of this century have employed the online publisher.

Lisa Blower (independent scholar, UK)

Does the Short Story exist?

George Green (Lancaster University, UK)

 

Panel 2: The short story on film B003
Altered States: Narrator and Audience Adaptations of Helen Simpson’s Short Stories.

Ingrid Cuypers (KU Leuven, Belgium)

Narration and Commemoration in the Story and the Film A Rose for Emily.

Esin Korkut (Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey)

Updating the Past: Thomas Hardy’s Wessex Tales on Film.

Lukas Lammers (Friedrich‐Alexander-Universität Erlangen‐Nürnberg, Germany)

 

11.00 – 11.15 Break & Refreshments Business School Foyer & Atrium
11.15 – 12.45 Parallel Sessions: Panels 3 & 4
Panel 3: Innovation, Technology and Genre B002
A new detective method: The Adventures of Richard Marsh’s Female Detective Judith Lee in the Strand Magazine, 1911-16.

Minna Vuohelainen (Edge Hill University, UK)

Haunting a mean house in a dull street: Time and Technology in the ghost stories of Edith Wharton and Elizabeth Bowen.

Emma Liggins (Manchester Metropolitan University, UK)

Revealing as Concealing: The Flash of the Epiphany Moment in the Modernist Short Story.

Sophia Kier-Byfield (University of Aarhus, Denmark)

  Panel 4: Reading, Writing, Teaching B003
Seeing and Not-Seeing the Short Story.

Anna Metcalfe (University of East Anglia, UK)

No time to be lost: Short stories as a compass in a changing world.

Philippa Holloway (Edge Hill University, UK)

With suspicious intent: Teaching the pleasures of Short Fiction.

Kerry Myler (Newman University, UK)

 

12.45 – 13.45 Lunch Business School Foyer & Atrium
13.45 – 14.45 ENSFR committee meeting
14.45 – 16.15 Parallel Sessions: Panels 5 & 6
Panel 5: The Short Story and Cinematic Form B002
Textual Portraits of Self and Other: Ruth Prawer Jhabvala’s ‘A Lovesong for India’.

Karen D’Souza (Edge Hill University, UK)

Beyond Cinema: Daphne du Maurier’s Intermedial Experiments in her Short Stories.

Christine Reynier (Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier, France)

The Spiritual Automaton: Cinematic Precursors in Steven Millhauser’s Short Fiction.

Simon Stevenson (University Centre Doncaster, UK)

 

  Panel 6: Twitter Fiction B003
Tweeting Short Stories: Jennifer Egan’s ‘Black Box’ and David Mitchell’s ‘The Right Sort’.

Elke D’hoker (University of Leuven, Belgium)

Curating Conclusions: Collaborative Twitter Fiction and the implied author.

Emma Segar (Edge Hill University, UK)

Short but not fleeting: Lydia Davis can teach us how to live (and tweet).

Julie Tanner (Independent scholar, UK)

16.15 – 16.30 Break & Refreshments Business School Foyer & Atrium
16.30 – 18.00 Short Story Readings (programme to follow) B001
18.00 Day 1 Close

 

 


 

‘The Child of the Century’:

Reading and Writing Short Fiction Across Media

 

Day 2, Saturday 14th May 2016

 

TIME SESSION VENUE
8.30 – 9.00 Refreshments Business School Foyer
9.00 – 9.30 Welcome B001
9.30 – 11.00 Parallel Sessions: Panels 7 & 8
Panel 7 : Flash, Hybridity, Cycles and Transformation B002
From Blog to Book and Back: Éric Chevillard’s Migrating Microfictions.

Erika Fülöp (Lancaster University, UK)

Transcultural and Transmedial Stories and Identities in Short Story Cycles: Tom Cho’s Look Who’s Morphing and Ali Alizadeh’s Transactions.

Manuela Zehnter (University of Bonn, Germany)

Hemingway, Twitterature and the Places of Indeterminacy – Discussion of Problems of Interpretation and the Position of the Reader in the World of Flash Fiction.

Roksana Zgierska (University of Gdansk, Poland)

 

  Panel 8: Art and Technology B003
We are Cyborgs: Technology in Hari Kunzru’s Short Fiction.

Bettina Jansen (TU Dresden, Germany)

Visionary Inner Spaces in J. G. Ballard’s Vermilion Sands.

C. Bruna Mancini (Università della Calabria, Italy)

Coherence and Counterpoint: Music in the Short Stories of James Joyce and Kazuo Ishiguro.

Thomas Gurke (Heinrich-Heine-University, Düsseldorf, Germany)

 

11.00 – 11.15 Break Business School Foyer & Atrium
11.15 – 12.45 Parallel Sessions: Panels 9 & 10
  Panel 9: Hybrid Forms B002
Adrian Tomine’s Visual Storytelling in Killing and Dying.

Mercedes Peñalba (University of Salamanca, Spain)

Intermedial synergy in Angela Carter’s short fiction.

Michelle Ryan-Sautour (Université d’Angers, France)

Generic Hybridisation in Janice Galloway’s “Scenes” from Blood (1991).

Jorge Sacido-Romero (University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain)

 

 

  Panel 10: Publishing 1: Authorship and Adaptation B003
Dis/honesty and risk in collaborative short fiction.

Micaela Maftei and Laura Tansley (University of Victoria, Canada and University of Glasgow, UK)

Narrative Brevity Across the Media: Rhetoric and Form.

Miłosz Wojtyna (University of Gdańsk, Poland)

 

12.45 – 14.00 Lunch Business School Foyer & Atrium
14.00 – 15.00 Nicholas Royle Reading and Questions B001
15.00 – 15.15 Break & Refreshments Business School Foyer & Atrium
15.15 – 16.45 Parallel Sessions: Panels 11 & 12
  Panel 11: Publishing 2: Excerpts and Anthologies B002
Cutting a Long Story Short or the Art of Excerpting the Right Passage: Richard Ford’s The Lay of the Land in the New Yorker.

Gerald Preher (Lille Catholic University, France)

Arriving, Settling, Moving on: Stories of Belonging and Displacement.

Eleonora Rao (University of Salerno, Italy)

The Construction of Gender in Hermione Lee’s Short Story Anthology The Secret Self.

Aleix Tura Vecino (University of Stirling, UK)

 

  Panel 12: Mysterious Visions B003
Mystification by Landscape: Margaret Atwood and the Group of Seven.

Dr Susan Poznar (Arkansas Tech University, USA)

Short Fiction and Theology: Foundational Myths and Marian Iconography in Michèle Roberts’s ‘Annunciation’.

Laura Lojo-Rodríguez (Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Spain)

 

16.45 – 17.00 Closing Remarks B001
17.00 Day 2 Close

 

Please note, programme subject to change.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This event is supported by Edge Hill University’s Institute for Creative Enterprise:

www.edgehill.ac.uk/ice

@edgehillice

Thresholds International Short Fiction Feature Writing Competition

 

http://blogs.chi.ac.uk/shortstoryforum/features-competition/

FREE ENTRY
750 to 2,000 words.
£500 first prize, plus 2x runner-up prizes £100 each
Deadline: 06 March 2016, 11:59pm (GMT).
Calling for feature essays on the short story form, either recommending a short story, collection or anthology, or profiling the life and writing of a short story writer. We look, above all, at the quality of prose, the insights offered, and your ability to really hook your readers. The focus must be on the short story form (short stories, though, are not eligible for entry).

Call for Papers The American Short Story: An Expansion of the Genre

Society for the Study of the American Short Story

 Call for Papers

 The American Short Story: An Expansion of the Genre

 A Symposium of the American Literature Association

The Society for the Study of the American Short Story (SSASS) requests proposals for papers and presentations at an international symposium on the short story to be held in Savannah, October 20-22, 2016, at the Hyatt Hotel. More information regarding hotel reservations, keynote speakers, and registrations details will be available in the spring of 2016 and will be posted on the new Society website:

americanshortstory.org.

Continue reading

ENSFR conference deadline for proposals

‘The Child of the Century’: Reading and Writing Short Fiction Across Media
Edge Hill University, UK, May 13-14, 2016: deadline for proposals extended to January 31st 2016.

Writing in 1936, Elizabeth Bowen said: ‘The short story is a young art; as we now know it, it is the child of this century. Poetic tautness and clarity are so essential to it that it may be said to stand at the edge of prose; in its use of action it is nearer to drama than to the novel. The cinema, itself busy with a technique, is of the same generation; in the last thirty years the two arts have been accelerating together.’

The child of the 20th century is still growing and developing in the 21st century, alongside an equally rapid acceleration in new media. Through discussions, presentations and performances, this conference will explore the generic affinities between short fiction and other art forms; intermedial transformations; and migrations of the form. This includes the impact of changing technologies on its writing and transmission, historically and at the present moment. Proposals are welcome from both critics and practitioners.

Topics include (but are not limited to) the following:

Short fiction as electronic literature; hypertext, twitter fiction and interactive short fiction
The short story, print and magazine culture
Short fiction and film
Short fiction and theatre
Short fiction and the visual arts, e.g. painting, photography, illustration
Short fiction and music
Short fiction and poetry
Graphic fiction
Short fiction in performance
Adaptation and hybridity
Short fiction authors working across media
Technology and form in short fiction
Short fiction, radio and podcast
New forms of transmission
Short fiction and social media
Digital research in short fiction

300-word abstracts for 20-minute papers should be sent to coxa@edgehill.ac.uk no later than midnight on the 31st of January 2016. Contributors should also send a short biographical note indicating institutional affiliation. It is envisaged that conference proceedings will be published as a special issue of the peer-reviewed journal Short Fiction in Theory and Practice:
http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Journal,id=196/

Edge Hill University is located in North West England, within easy reach of Liverpool. http://www.edgehill.ac.uk/.

Katherine Mansfield and the Art of the Short Story Bandol, France, 10-12 June 2016

Conference organised by the Katherine Mansfield Society Hosted by the town of Bandol, France Supported by the New Zealand Embassy, Paris and the University of Northampton, UK

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS Professor Enda Duffy University of California, Santa Barbara, USA Professor Ailsa Cox Edge Hill University, UK

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS This international conference celebrates the centenary of Katherine Mansfield’s visit to Bandol, where ‘The Aloe’ (the first draft of ‘Prelude’), was completed, Jan-March 1916. The genesis of this story bears witness to Mansfield’s development as a modernist writer, with her everyday subject matter and privileging of modernity, her focus on small, seemingly insignificant details at the expense of comprehensive description, her preference for the vignette which provides the reader with only fleeting glimpses of people and places, and her preoccupation with colour and her emphasis on surfaces and reflections. Her employment of multiple, shifting perspectives which are both subjective and fractured also displays an affinity with Impressionism, as does the attention she pays to the ephemeral effects of artificial and natural light, weather effects, and seasonal changes. Like painting in watercolours, short story writing may seem a deceptively easy task for those who have not attempted it, and this goes part way to explain the dismissive tone taken by so many critics towards the genre.

H. E. Bates was an early-twentieth-century critic who understood this difficulty: ‘[t]he short story is the most difficult and exacting of all prose forms; it must not be allowed to foster the illusion […] that its very brevity makes it easy to do’. Clare Hanson makes the claim that the short story has often been the ‘chosen form of the exile […] who longs to return to a home country which is denied him/her’, Mansfield’s work being an obvious example of this tenet. Even today, the short story is perceived to be a lesser genre, contributing to the view held by some critics of Mansfield as a minor writer. Yet, the development of her own particular free indirect discourse form of writing, linking it to literary impressionism, culminated in her position as one of the most important early exponents of the modernist short story. Her techniques include the use of symbolism and humour; themes incorporate violence, war, death, childbirth, relationships – especially in marriage – together with feminist and sexual issues. Suggested topics for papers might include:

• The modernist short story • KM as practitioner of the short story genre • KM’s development as a short story writer • KM in the South of France • KM as commentator on the short story • KM and her legacy to the short story form • Literary influences on KM as a short story writer • Artistic and musical influences on KM as a short story writer • KM, the short story and the marketplace • Reception of KM as a short story writer

Abstracts of 200 words, together with a short bio-sketch, should be sent to the conference organisers: Dr Gerri Kimber, University of Northampton, UK Professor Janet Wilson, University of Northampton, UK at kms@katherinemansfieldsociety.org Submission deadline: 31 March 2016.

Adaptation Conference, Lille 2016: Call for Papers

Adaptation, Revision, Translation: From Life to Art, from the Page to Stage and Screen

June 17-18, 2016 at Lille Catholic University

Reflecting upon the new edition of her Theory of Adaptation published in 2013, Linda Hutcheon feels that the first version of her study only looked at adaptation “in terms of repetition with variation.” She now sees “new forms and platforms” and wonders “where to draw the line at what we call an adaptation?” In an endeavour to fuel the body of work already available on adaptation theory, this conference means to explore a variety of avenues. Contributors are welcome to work on textual manipulations: short stories being turned into novels, the use of myth, legends and of the epic tradition in children’s books or “original rewritings” such as Michael Cunningham’s The Hours (1998).

History or real crime finding their way into fiction or film also have their place here, whether in detective fiction classics like F. Tennyson Jesse’s A Pin to See the Peepshow (1934) or glamorous historical bestsellers like Philippa Gregory’s The Other Boleyn Girl (2001). As Linda Seger points out, “adaptation is a transition, a conversion, from one medium to another. All original material will put up a fight, as if it were saying ‘take me as I am’.” How novelists and screenwriters resist that temptation and engage in the necessary reconceptualising in order to create a storyline and a work of art is an essential part of our subject.

It will also be interesting to reflect, in a more traditional way, on adaptations of fiction into film and, in a less conventional way, on fiction that derives from film. We shall thus see in what ways Kamilla Elliott’s comments in Rethinking the Novel/Film Debate can be taken further for, according to her, “if art draws from real life, then an art adapting another art is one step further away from real life as a representation of a representation.” Other points of entry would be to dive into the relationship between plays and musicals (My Fair Lady being the classic example of the genre) or from a story or event to painting, sculpture or graphic art. As Hutcheon’s study suggests, adaptation is interactive in that it enables “the knowing audience” to envisage “adaptation as adaptation.” The remakes of famous films – re-adaptations – such as The Great Gatsby could lead to discussions on revision as a means of introducing the young public to classics. Other forms of adaptation such as fan fiction or new translations of famous works could also be taken into consideration. The word “adaptation” will thus be understood in a broad sense, making interdisciplinary approaches possible.

Abstracts of about 500 words should be sent to Suzanne Bray (suzanne.bray@univ-catholille.fr) and Gérald Préher (gerald.preher@univ-catholille.fr) before January 15, 2016 along with a short biographical note.

Academic panel: Suzanne Bray (Lille Catholic University), Cindy Hamilton (Liverpool Hope University), Jacqui Miller (Liverpool Hope University), Gérald Préher (Lille Catholic University)

 

Conference Programme: Haunting in Short Fiction and Its Adaptations

Haunting in Short Fiction and Its Adaptations

20-21 November 2015, University of Angers, France

Edge Hill University, University of Leuven,
University of Le Mans, University of Nantes, University of Angers and the European Network for Short Fiction Research

Friday 20 November 2015

9 a.m. registration

9.30 – 11 a.m. PANELS 1, 2

Panel 1: Maternal Ghosts ¡ Frida Kahlo room

Helen E. Mundler, Université Paris-Est Créteil

The maternal impulse as ghost: three hauntings in contemporary women’s fiction: A.S. Byatt, Fay Weldon, Alison Lurie

Pascale Tollance, Université de Lyon 2

A Writer’s Ghosts: The Spectre of Matricide in A.S Byatt’s “The Changeling”

Leslie de Bont, Université de Nantes

“Effy’s Passion for the Mother Who Had Not Loved her Was the Supernatural Thing”: Haunting as an expression of attachment in May Sinclair’s “The Intercessor”

Panel 2: Domestic Ghosts ¡ Germaine Tillion room Continue reading

CFP ENSFR conference 2016 – ‘The Child of the Century’: Reading and Writing Short Fiction Across Media

Call for Papers
‘The Child of the Century’: Reading and Writing Short Fiction Across Media

A conference of the European Network for Short Fiction Research
Edge Hill University, UK, May 13-14, 2016

Writing in 1936, Elizabeth Bowen said: ‘The short story is a young art; as we now know it, it is the child of this century. Poetic tautness and clarity are so essential to it that it may be said to stand at the edge of prose; in its use of action it is nearer to drama than to the novel. The cinema, itself busy with a technique, is of the same generation; in the last thirty years the two arts have been accelerating together.’

The child of the 20th century is still growing and developing in the 21st century, alongside an equally rapid acceleration in new media. Through discussions, presentations and performances, this conference will explore the generic affinities between short fiction and other art forms; intermedial transformations; and migrations of the form. This includes the impact of changing technologies on its writing and transmission, historically and at the present moment. Proposals are welcome from both critics and practitioners.

Topics include (but are not limited to) the following:

Short fiction as electronic literature; hypertext, twitter fiction and interactive short fiction
The short story, print and magazine culture
Short fiction and film
Short fiction and theatre
Short fiction and the visual arts, e.g. painting, photography, illustration
Short fiction and music
Short fiction and poetry
Graphic fiction
Short fiction in performance
Adaptation and hybridity
Short fiction authors working across media
Technology and form in short fiction
Short fiction, radio and podcast
New forms of transmission
Short fiction and social media
Digital research in short fiction

300-word abstracts for 20-minute papers should be sent to coxa@edgehill.ac.uk no later than midnight on the 15th of January 2016. Contributors should also send a short biographical note indicating institutional affiliation. It is envisaged that conference proceedings will be published as a special issue of the peer-reviewed journal Short Fiction in Theory and Practice:
http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Journal,id=196/
For further information about the European Network for Short Fiction Research see:
http://ensfr.hypotheses.org/

Edge Hill University is located in North West England, within easy reach of Liverpool. http://www.edgehill.ac.uk/.

Conference program: Short Fiction Writers With a Theory: Re-Reading Short Fiction Theory Through the Lens of New Writing and New Media

Poster Short Fiction Writers

Short Fiction Writers With a Theory: Re-Reading Short Fiction Theory Through the Lens of New Writing and New Media

11-12 June 2015, Université Catholique de Lille, France

Room RS 248 — 58 rue du Port — 59000 Lille

Continue reading

CFP The British Short Story Cycle

CONSTRUCTING COHERENCE IN THE BRITISH SHORT STORY CYCLE

15-16 October 2015

Johannes Gutenberg University (Mainz, Germany)

Patrick Alasdair Gill (Mainz) and Florian Kläger (Würzburg)

While the American short story cycle has recently been the object of extensive critical discussion, the same can hardly be said of its British counterpart. Still, thematically unified short story cycles would appear to constitute an established feature of the British literary landscape: recent specimens include Graham Swift’s Learning to Swim, Salman Rushdie’s East, West, Julian Barnes’s Cross Channel, Adam Thorpe’s Shifts, Sara Maitland’s Moss Witch, A. L. Kennedy’s What Becomes, and Kazuo Ishiguro’s Nocturnes. By reference to these and other British examples of the form, this conference aims to explore the generic characteristics of the short story cycle alongside and against those of the novel and the short story collection, pursuing questions such as:

  •  What are specific effects of a story cycle’s coherence as against that of a novel on one end of the spectrum and a story collection/compilation on the other?
  •  How can the construction of coherence in the short story cycle be situated generically vis-à-vis other narrative cycles (e.g., in television, film, comics, web videos, etc.)?
  •  How do readers participate in the production of such coherence? Does reader participation in the short story cycle differ qualitatively from the creation of coherence in other genres?
  •  What aspects, other than recurrent themes or characters, can serve as agents of coherence?
  •  If the cycle relies on recurrent themes and characters, how is their function enhanced by use in a story cycle rather than a novel or other longer narrative genres?
  •  What insights are to be gained from comparisons between the short story cycle in the British Isles and in other literatures?
  •  What are forms and functions of paratextual features in short story cycles?
  •  Which economic or other material aspects have (had) a decisive impact on the development of the genre in Britain?

We invite twenty-minute papers on these or related questions. Please send a 250-word abstract along with your institutional affiliation and a short biographical blurb to <patrick.gill@uni-mainz.de> and <florian.klaeger@uni-wuerzburg.de> before the 15th of May.

 

Publication JSSE 63 “The 21st Century Irish Short Story”

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 Michelle Ryan-Sautour and Gérald Préher
Foreword

Bertrand Cardin
Introduction

PART ONE: TRACES OF ORAL TRADITION: VOICES, DIALOGUES AND CONVERSATIONS

Marie Mianowski
Skipping and Gasping, Sighing and Hoping in Colum McCann’s “Aisling”: The Making of a Poet

Catherine Conan
Narration as Conversation: Patterns of Community-making in Colm Tóibín’s The Empty Family

Eoghan Smith
“Elemental and Plain”: Story-Telling in Claire Keegan’s Walk the Blue Fields

Continue reading

Cfp ENSFR Conference “Haunting” (Angers 20-21 November 2015)

Call for Papers

Haunting in Short Fiction and Its Adaptations

20-21 November 2015, University of Angers, France (in collaboration with Edge Hill University, University of Leuven, University of Le Mans, and University of Nantes)

There is a long tradition of haunting in short fiction, often appearing in the form of ghost stories, folk tales, fairy tales, and legends. Short narrative indeed appears to embrace the supernatural. Elizabeth Bowen explains, for example, in the preface to A Day in the Dark and Other Stories that while she uses “the supernatural” in her short stories, she considers it “unethical’ to do so in a novel. In “The Flash of Fireflies” (1968), Nadine Gordimer similarly observes how short fiction navigates the uneasy borders of the supernatural and the rational world, explaining how “Fantasy in the hands of short story writers is so much more successful than when in the hands of novelists because it is necessary for it to hold good only for the brief illumination of the situation it dominates.”  Continue reading